Updating mysql php


27-Sep-2017 18:45

Example output: [0.072][1][80]: UPDATE MYTABLE SET FIELD = 1; [0.106][1][758]: UPDATE ANOTHERTABLE SET FIELD = 2; [0.006][-1][0]: UPDATER ANOTHERTABLE SET FIELD = 2; The output shows: [Timetaken][result[lines affected] The result will be either -1, 0 or 1, -1 means there's a problem with the sql statement, 1 means it executed correctly, 0 means it wasn't executed.In the case of INSERT where a row/slot had been previously deleted, making an uncollapsed hole in the table, and the record being inserted fills that empty row/slot, that is to say, the inserted data did not create a new row/slot/space, then this may explain why a zero result is returned by this function.So if you use one SQL request to insert several rows at a time, and some are inserted, some are just updated, you won't get the real count.calling mysql_affected_rows(null)is not the same that calling mysql_affected_rows()So, if you have a $link variable that could be null, you must writeif($link) $n=mysql_affected_rows($link);else $n=mysql_affected_rows(); It works also for REPLACE query,returning:0 if the record it's already updated (0 record modified),1 if the record it's new (1 record inserted),2 if the record it's updated (2 operations: 1 deletion 1 insertion) Here's a little function I've been using for a while now, pass it two parameters (action command (1 or 0 see notes)) and a sql statement.When using UPDATE, My SQL will not update columns where the new value is the same as the old value.This creates the possibility that may not actually equal the number of rows matched, only the number of rows that were literally affected by the query.

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Example output: [0.072][1][80]: UPDATE MYTABLE SET FIELD = 1; [0.106][1][758]: UPDATE ANOTHERTABLE SET FIELD = 2; [0.006][-1][0]: UPDATER ANOTHERTABLE SET FIELD = 2; The output shows: [Timetaken][result]][lines affected] The result will be either -1, 0 or 1, -1 means there's a problem with the sql statement, 1 means it executed correctly, 0 means it wasn't executed.

In the case of INSERT where a row/slot had been previously deleted, making an uncollapsed hole in the table, and the record being inserted fills that empty row/slot, that is to say, the inserted data did not create a new row/slot/space, then this may explain why a zero result is returned by this function.

So if you use one SQL request to insert several rows at a time, and some are inserted, some are just updated, you won't get the real count.

calling mysql_affected_rows(null)is not the same that calling mysql_affected_rows()So, if you have a $link variable that could be null, you must writeif($link) $n=mysql_affected_rows($link);else $n=mysql_affected_rows(); It works also for REPLACE query,returning:0 if the record it's already updated (0 record modified),1 if the record it's new (1 record inserted),2 if the record it's updated (2 operations: 1 deletion 1 insertion) Here's a little function I've been using for a while now, pass it two parameters (action command (1 or 0 see notes)) and a sql statement.

When using UPDATE, My SQL will not update columns where the new value is the same as the old value.

This creates the possibility that may not actually equal the number of rows matched, only the number of rows that were literally affected by the query.

It returns a simple line which shows the length of time taken to action the query, the status of the query (0= query not actioned, you can set this value for testing, 1=success qry executed successfully, -1= failed, there was a problem with the sql statement) the number of lines affected by that query and the sql statement itself.

I've found this invaluable when trying to tie down large amounts of updates to a table, using this you can easily see where a query was successfully executed and the number of rows are affected, or where there are problems and a statement has failed for example.

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The second query then does not fail because the "duplicate" record is no longer a duplicate, as the original one has just been deleted. ON DUPLICATE KEY UPDATE" syntax, mysql_affected_rows() will return you 2 if the UPDATE was made (just as it does with the "REPLACE INTO" syntax) and 1 if the INSERT was.You have a REPLACE query on t1 followed by an INSERT query on t2 and expect the second query to fail if there's an attempted insert of a duplicate record.